Internet cencorship – Sentry Parental Controls http://sentryparentalcontrols.com/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 11:19:42 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://sentryparentalcontrols.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/favicon-9-150x150.png Internet cencorship – Sentry Parental Controls http://sentryparentalcontrols.com/ 32 32 Venezuela tapped 20% of Telefónica user lines, report reveals https://sentryparentalcontrols.com/venezuela-tapped-20-of-telefonica-user-lines-report-reveals/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 11:19:42 +0000 https://sentryparentalcontrols.com/venezuela-tapped-20-of-telefonica-user-lines-report-reveals/ Placeholder while loading article actions Long-standing suspicions of wiretapping by the Venezuelan government were confirmed last week in a report published by Telefónica, the Spanish parent company of Movistar, one of the three main mobile phone providers in Venezuela. According to the report, more than one million Venezuelan users were monitored last year. Among the […]]]>
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Long-standing suspicions of wiretapping by the Venezuelan government were confirmed last week in a report published by Telefónica, the Spanish parent company of Movistar, one of the three main mobile phone providers in Venezuela. According to the report, more than one million Venezuelan users were monitored last year.

Among the report’s key facts: 1,584,547 phone lines were tapped in 2021, representing more than 20% of Telefónica’s customers in Venezuela. Government entities also requested metadata for some 997,679 accounts, or 13% of users.

The report – which details phone tapping and internet censorship in the various countries where Telefónica operates – was released as a result of “our human rights due diligence”, the company wrote.

Telefónica and Venezuelan government entities — including the National Telecommunications Commission (CONATEL), the Bolivarian National Intelligence Service, and the offices of the president and attorney general — did not respond to multiple Washington Post requests for comment.

A woman’s TikTok video mocked Venezuelan politicians. She was arrested.

The newly released document provides insight into the extent to which Venezuela’s government and intelligence forces have encroached on citizens’ lives and attempted to keep the country’s residents in the dark, said Andrés Azpúrua, director of the watchdog group. Internet VE sin Filtro. He and other experts warn that the report depicts the “tip of the iceberg” when it comes to diminishing freedom of expression in Venezuela.

“The scope of government intrusion is far greater than we ever imagined. This is literally full-scale espionage,” Azpúrua said.

The company reported that it tapped the phone lines of far fewer customers in other countries – in fact, phone line interceptions in a dozen countries where Telefónica operates accounted for less than 1% of its total users. Of the more than 1.9 million accounts that Telefónica operated in Latin America and Europe, 80% were Venezuelan.

Unlike other countries, interception requests in Venezuela bypass court orders and are instead made by CONATEL on behalf of the country’s military, police, and intelligence agencies, as well as the Experimental University. security, which trains the police and security forces. The number of wiretapping solicitations they submitted to Telefónica has exploded over time, nearly quadrupling, from around 235,000 in 2017 to more than 861,000 in 2021.

Between 2016 and 2021, Telefónica denied 56,228 requests, according to the report.

The true extent of government surveillance remains largely unknown – after all, Telefónica is just one of Venezuela’s telecommunications providers, said political analyst Nicmer Evans.

“If we consider other Venezuelan public providers, that number could well exceed 5 million people,” he said. “How can a state justify keeping tabs on so many people? This bears no kind of comparison with any other totalitarian system in the world. This is a prime example of the government abusing its power to exert control over the population.

In addition to wiretapping, the document describes how Telefónica, at the behest of the government, increasingly censored internet content across Venezuela, blocking 30 URLs in 2021.

The report did not reveal which web addresses were blocked. However, watchdog group VE sin Filtro documented some 68 web domains that were banned for Venezuelan users in 2021, Azpúrua said — including 45 owned by media outlets; eight to political commentary portals; six to child pornography; four to media sites, including those offering streaming services and SoundCloud; three to human rights organizations; and two to websites dedicated to installing VPNs.

“It’s normal for a government to restrict access to websites related to terrorism and that sort of thing,” Azpúrua said. “But when you have a government blocking more media than any other kind of site, that’s when you see it’s a terrible and unprecedented attack on free speech.”

In Venezuela, priests found guilty of abuse have taken over the ministry

Amid a barrage of threats to the media, a growing number of journalists facing exile, and dwindling resources for reporting, information deserts have become widespread in Venezuela. The remaining outlets face a “mountain of obstacles”, said Miguel Henrique Otero, president of El Nacional, one of Venezuela’s last independent newspapers.

Since January, he said, El Nacional’s web page has been blocked by Telefónica and other providers following verbal threats by former vice president Diosdado Cabello on live television. The outlet had published an article about an investigation into Cabello’s alleged involvement in drug trafficking organizations. Cabello is wanted by the US State Department and is facing federal indictment on drug-related charges.

“[Cabello] announced that he was going to shut us up on his program, and that’s exactly what happened,” Otero said. “Telefónica is complicit in following up on orders to violate human rights, without any justification or due process.”

El Nacional lost 40% of its traffic due to the blockade, he added. But what’s worse, Otero said, is that the outlet can’t do much. Adding to the misfortunes is a crippling lawsuit by Cabello against the newspaper, which ended in a heavy fine and the seizure of the headquarters of El Nacional by the government.

“The government has already taken our building. They block our content. I am in exile,” he said. “The only thing left is to keep throwing a tantrum, and that’s what I will keep doing.”

The sheer volume of censorship and surveillance described in Telefónica’s report is compounded by Venezuela’s 2017 anti-hate law, which technically prohibits the promotion of “fascism, hatred and intolerance,” but has been used to prosecute the dissidents. Critics wonder how the government uses the vast amount of data at its fingertips, said Carlos F. Lusverti, a professor and researcher at the Center for Human Rights at Universidad Católica Andrés Bello in Venezuela.

“It aggravates the situation in terms of privacy but also stigmatization campaigns and attacks on people,” Lusverti said. “These leaks expose, for example, victims of human rights abuses because typical privacy spaces are violated, such as privacy between lawyers and clients or between medical staff and patients.”

Four indigenous people killed in a “clash” with the Venezuelan army because of Wi-Fi

In Venezuela, the specter of espionage loomed so large that for years it seemed like a third party had eyes and ears on every message and every phone call.

Until 2008, opposition groups took steps to try to evade surveillance. For example, student activists, Azpúrua recalls, would huddle in a room to plan an upcoming protest—telling each other the location but identifying another in their texts. It would buy them time before state police forces move in to arrest them, he said.

In a country where censorship has been something of an open secret, Telefónica’s report left many Venezuelans with “dystopian-like assurance” that their long-held suspicions weren’t just paranoia, Azpúrua said. . While some are in disbelief, others are angered by the latest sign that the internet – a space that has become so vast and free to the rest of the world – is continually shrinking for Venezuelans.

“And the worst thing is that this report doesn’t even cover everything,” Azpúrua said. “It’s just the tip of the iceberg – and it’s scary to think of anything below what we can actually see.”

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Why can’t I access my social media websites? https://sentryparentalcontrols.com/why-cant-i-access-my-social-media-websites/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 10:26:01 +0000 https://sentryparentalcontrols.com/why-cant-i-access-my-social-media-websites/ Social media has quickly become one of the most popular platforms on the internet. Between Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and even YouTube, people spend hours every day browsing online platforms. Perhaps the biggest attraction of social media is the freedom that comes with it and the ability to customize it to your liking. Also, social media […]]]>

Social media has quickly become one of the most popular platforms on the internet. Between Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and even YouTube, people spend hours every day browsing online platforms. Perhaps the biggest attraction of social media is the freedom that comes with it and the ability to customize it to your liking.

Also, social media allows you to keep in touch with your friends and family and update them on what is happening in your life. Accessing any social media platform is as easy as visiting the site and logging into your account.

But sometimes it’s just not that easy. You may think that you can access your social media platforms and accounts from anywhere and anytime. However, some countries use internet censorship to prevent you from accessing any social media websites. Why is that? Keep reading to find out!

What is Internet censorship?

First, let’s dig deeper into the definition of internet censorship. As you might have guessed, internet censorship happens when access to certain websites is blocked. You might know this if your workplace restricts access to social media websites during office hours. However, some entire countries also block websites.

This means that the websites are simply not accessible to anyone within the country’s borders. The reasons why countries use internet censorship vary. For example, in the Middle East, countries will block explicit websites and anti-Islamic content for religious reasons.

So why would a country block social media websites? The truth is that some countries block social media websites, the most prominent example being China. The Chinese government opposes social media, and they are infamous for their strict internet censorship.

China uses the Great Firewall to block access to specific websites within its borders. This includes foreign news websites, social media and even some Google services such as the search engine, as well as the video and image search function – other services such as Google Maps are still available in China.

The reason why China would block social media websites is purely political. The primary reason cited by the Chinese government for blocking social media websites is that protesters were using social media platforms to coordinate attacks and protests against the government. Images and videos of police brutality were also shared, and foreigners shared posts that portrayed the Chinese government in a bad light — in other words, the Chinese government was completely undermined by social media.

Blocking access to all social media websites seemed like the best solution for them, and it remains that way to this day. However, this causes some frustration among tourists visiting China who want to access their social media profiles to post photos and videos or connect with friends and family.

What is a VPN?

Fortunately, there is a solution to this problem, and it comes in the form of a handy cybersecurity tool that you can install on your device. The tool in question is known as VPN or virtual private network. VPNs have become incredibly popular in recent years thanks to their unblocking capabilities, which allow users to bypass internet censorship and geo-blocking, but we’ll see how that happens in a minute.

First, the main job of a VPN is to secure your connection. It does this by encrypting your internet connection, which is especially important if you’re using insecure connections such as those found on public Wi-Fi hotspots. These hotspots are conveniently located at airports, hotels, and restaurants, making them the perfect way for tourists to connect to the Internet in a foreign country.

These insecure connections are where cybercriminals thrive. Hackers will be able to virtually spy on your device. This lets them see what you’re doing on your device, whether it’s entering passwords or sending emails.

While your VPN is connected, no one will be able to see what you are doing on your device. Even your internet service provider and the government will not be able to track your internet traffic.

The main function we are looking for is the ability to unblock websites. Your VPN can connect to one of many secure global servers in another country or city around the world. Once you are connected to the server, your real IP address will be masked and the server IP address will be adopted instead. This will make the website believe that you are accessing it from another country.

This might explain how you bypass geo-blocking, but you might be wondering how it works for internet censorship – surely your internet access is blocked within the country’s borders. Well, that’s true, but a VPN will still do the trick. Think of a VPN as a tunnel created in the network. Your device can sneak through this tunnel (undetected) and connect to the internet through the server of your choice.

It is important to remember that you must install a VPN on your device before traveling to a country that uses internet censorship. Countries that use internet censorship know what a VPN can do, and so they will block websites that allow you to download VPNs, making it completely impossible to unblock websites once you’re there. within their borders.

How to Choose the Right VPN

Before installing a VPN on your device, there are a few things to keep in mind. The first is that you should avoid free VPNs. You will inevitably come across free VPNs, and it might be tempting to use them, but overall premium VPNs perform better both in terms of security and unblocking capabilities. If you use a free VPN, you will encounter serious drawbacks such as daily data limits, slower connection speeds, more ads, and fewer global servers. All in all, free cybersecurity tools should always be avoided as they can always put your device at risk by not giving you the best possible protection.

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Old assault video misleads online after brutal attack on women in Tangshan, northern China https://sentryparentalcontrols.com/old-assault-video-misleads-online-after-brutal-attack-on-women-in-tangshan-northern-china/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 03:55:54 +0000 https://sentryparentalcontrols.com/old-assault-video-misleads-online-after-brutal-attack-on-women-in-tangshan-northern-china/ Copyright AFP 2017-2022. All rights reserved. Violent footage of a man beating two women has been viewed thousands of times in Chinese-language social media posts that claim the assault happened shortly after a brutal attack in China’s Hebei province that caused outrage in the country. However, the clip was shared in a misleading context; it […]]]>

Copyright AFP 2017-2022. All rights reserved.

Violent footage of a man beating two women has been viewed thousands of times in Chinese-language social media posts that claim the assault happened shortly after a brutal attack in China’s Hebei province that caused outrage in the country. However, the clip was shared in a misleading context; it circulated online in reports stating that it was filmed in Hebei in August 2018.

The graphic video was shared on Twitter on June 16, 2022 and has since been viewed over 7,400 times.

The video, which appears to have been filmed inside a restaurant, shows a man hitting a woman with a chair before hitting her and banging her head repeatedly against a table.

He also hits another woman – who appears to have come to stop the assault – with a chair, before kicking and punching her, then hitting her in the head with a chair.

The video’s Chinese caption translates to: “The Tangshan barbecue incident hasn’t even calmed down; women were again beaten in Handan.

Handan is a city in Hebei province in northern China.

The post circulated days after viral footage of a violent assault on a group of women at a restaurant in Tangshan – also in Hebei – sparked outrage over predatory sexual behavior.

The Tangshan incident has rekindled an online debate about sexual harassment and gender-based violence in China where the conversation about women’s rights has grown in recent years despite pressure from a patriarchal society, internet censorship and uneven legal support.

Simplified Chinese characters superimposed on the video in the misleading post claim it shows a “follow-up” to the Tangshan attack.

A screenshot, taken on June 17, 2022, of the misleading post

The video was also shared with similar claims showing a “follow-up” to the Tangshan incident on Facebook and Douyin, China’s version of TikTok.

However, AFP found no recent reports of a similar attack in Handan following the Tangshan incident.

In fact, the video shared in the posts predates the Tangshan assault by more than three years.

Old Handan assault video

Combined reverse image and keyword searches on Baidu found the same video posted on August 30, 2018 by WeVideo, a news project jointly launched by Chinese news agency The Beijing News and technology company Tencent.

The report that featured the video was titled, “Hebei Handan: Three Men Clashes With Nearby Diners While Eating and Brutally Beat Women With Stools.”

Below is a screenshot comparison of the video in one of the misleading posts (left) and the clip in the WeVideo report (right):

Local news organizations Guancha and Beijing Time also reported on the incident in 2018 and featured corresponding clips in their articles.

Reports say the incident happened in Yongnian District of Handan.

Two suspects were initially arrested for the attack, according to an incident report released by the Yongnian Public Security Bureau.

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Authors Jason Reynolds and Nancy Pearl join high school students to unite against book bans at the world’s largest library event in Washington, DC on June 25 https://sentryparentalcontrols.com/authors-jason-reynolds-and-nancy-pearl-join-high-school-students-to-unite-against-book-bans-at-the-worlds-largest-library-event-in-washington-dc-on-june-25/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 21:08:14 +0000 https://sentryparentalcontrols.com/authors-jason-reynolds-and-nancy-pearl-join-high-school-students-to-unite-against-book-bans-at-the-worlds-largest-library-event-in-washington-dc-on-june-25/ WASHINGTON, DC – Jason Reynolds, award-winning young adult author, Nancy Pearl, author of Book Lust, and Deborah Caldwell-Stone, intellectual freedom advocate for the American Library Association (ALA), will join students at Bell Multicultural High School (Washington, DC) to advocate for the right to read and the joy of claiming that right. The discussion will take […]]]>

WASHINGTON, DC – Jason Reynolds, award-winning young adult author, Nancy Pearl, author of Book Lust, and Deborah Caldwell-Stone, intellectual freedom advocate for the American Library Association (ALA), will join students at Bell Multicultural High School (Washington, DC) to advocate for the right to read and the joy of claiming that right. The discussion will take place at the world’s largest library event, the ALA Annual Conference and Expos, to be held in Washington, DC, June 24-27.

“ALA is proud to have students join the conversation about book bans alongside our esteemed authors, because young people are their best advocates for reading freedom,” said Deborah Caldwell-Stone, Director of the Office. of the ALA for intellectual freedom. “Books are particularly important tools for students who want and need access to books that help them understand complex and difficult issues. Limiting young people’s access to these books does not protect them from life’s challenges, but access to books can cultivate critical thinking and open up new horizons for them.

During National Library Week (April 2022), ALA launched a new public awareness campaign: United against book bans. More than 40 national partners, including the American Federation of Teachers, Authors Guild, Human Rights Council and Publishers, have signed on to the Unite Against Book Bans campaign, providing resources and tools for readers to use their voice in the public arena to stop the efforts. to ban books nationally and locally.

WHO: Authors Jason Reynolds and Nancy Pearl; Deborah Caldwell-Stone, Director, ALA Office for Intellectual Freedom; Bell High School Library Ambassadors

WHAT: United against book bans

WHERE: Saturday, June 25, 2022, 4:00 p.m. ET/1:00 p.m. PT

WHEN: Washington Convention Center* and virtual

Highlights:

About the speakers:

  • Jason Reynolds is a New York Times #1 bestselling author and winner of numerous awards for his books, including All American Boys (co-authored with Brendan Kiely); When I was the greatest; The Boy in the Black Suit; Stamp; As brave as you; For everyone; the Track series (Ghost, Patina, Sunny and Lu); Look both ways; Stuntman, meanwhile; Ain’t Burned All the Bright; My name is Jason. Mine too. (with Jason Griffin); and Long Way Down, which received a Newbery Honor, a Printz Honor and a Coretta Scott King Honor. He lives in Washington, DC. You can find his ramblings at JasonWritesBooks.com.
  • Nancy Pearl talks about the pleasures of reading and books on “Book Lust with Nancy Pearl,” her monthly television show on the Seattle Channel. Pearl has received numerous awards and accolades, and in 2021 the National Book Foundation, presenter of the National Book Awards, named her the recipient of its 2021 Literary Award for Outstanding Service to the American Literary Community. She worked in the Detroit, Tulsa, and Seattle public library systems, and later wrote the popular “Book Lust” series, four titles filled with recommendations for great books to read.
  • Deborah Caldwell-Stone is Director of ALA’s Office for Intellectual Freedom and Executive Director of the Freedom to Read Foundation. Throughout her 20-year tenure at ALA, Caldwell-Stone has worked closely with library workers and library administrators on a wide range of intellectual freedom and privacy issues, including challenges related to books, internet censorship, meeting room policies, and the privacy and confidentiality of library users. . Prior to joining the ALA in 2000, Caldwell-Stone was an attorney and former appellate litigator in Chicago.
  • Bell High School (Washington, DC) Library Ambassadors, led by school librarian Christopher Stewart, promote library resources, help with projects and events, learn about careers as a librarian, and promote a culture of peace, love and literacy.

About ALA:

The American Library Association (ALA) is the leading national organization providing resources to inspire library and information professionals to transform their communities through essential programs and services. For more than 140 years, ALA has been the trusted voice of academic, public, school, government and special libraries, advocating for the profession and the role of the library in improving learning and access to information for all.

* ALA monitors the latest health and safety guidelines for large group gatherings from the CDC, DC Department of Health and the Walter E. Washington Convention Center. Please see the American Library Association’s 2022 Annual Conference Health Protocols for more information.

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Hong Kong is unrecognizable after 2 years under national security law – The Diplomat https://sentryparentalcontrols.com/hong-kong-is-unrecognizable-after-2-years-under-national-security-law-the-diplomat/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 05:43:42 +0000 https://sentryparentalcontrols.com/hong-kong-is-unrecognizable-after-2-years-under-national-security-law-the-diplomat/ Advertising On June 10, FactWire announced its closure with immediate effect, becoming the tenth Hong Kong news agency to close in less than 12 months. FactWire had used an innovative crowdfunding model to produce Chinese-language investigative journalism, exemplifying the kind of award-winning independent media that once thrived in the territory. But just as many feared […]]]>

On June 10, FactWire announced its closure with immediate effect, becoming the tenth Hong Kong news agency to close in less than 12 months. FactWire had used an innovative crowdfunding model to produce Chinese-language investigative journalism, exemplifying the kind of award-winning independent media that once thrived in the territory. But just as many feared when Beijing imposed the National Security Law (NSL) on June 30, 2020, the free expression landscape in Hong Kong is now increasingly desolate.

Under the NSL, Hong Kong’s total score in Freedom in the World, Freedom House’s annual report on political rights and civil liberties, fell 12 points, from 55 to 43, on a scale of 0 to 100. The score has decreased by nine points. in 2021 alone, marking the third-worst global decline of the year after Myanmar and Afghanistan, which respectively experienced a military coup and a Taliban conquest. This is particularly important given that most countries and territories where freedoms are deteriorating only see their scores drop by a point or two in any given year.

The security law served as a crucial tool in Beijing’s devastating authoritarian takeover of Hong Kong, enabling the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) to bring about a free and vibrant society.

Here are some of the five most significant changes to free speech under the NSL:

1. Demolition of independent media

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Since the NSL’s introduction, authorities have crushed major pro-democracy outlets like Apple Daily and Stand News, which closed after police raided their offices and arrested staff on national security grounds. Police visited another outlet in May and asked the founder to remove items believed to endanger national security. In the past 12 months, seven other Chinese-language media outlets have shut down and two have limited their operations, although some small outlets or individual journalists continue to post on social media.

In total, around 20% of Chinese-language media workers in Hong Kong have lost their jobs in the national security crackdown. English-language outlets like Hong Kong Free Press and the South China Morning Post, which is owned by mainland Alibaba, still produce independent content but could be targets of future crackdown efforts.

2. Journalists added to a growing list of Political prisoners

At least 12 journalists and media professionals have been charged with NSL or crimes of sedition for their work, including Apple Daily owner Jimmy Lai and senior Stand News executives. Lai’s trial is expected to take place this summer.

The NSL’s ‘collusion with foreign forces’ charge, which was applied to journalists who published opinion pieces calling for international sanctions against those who undermine human rights and political autonomy in Hong Kong, carries a maximum sentence of life imprisonment. Sedition charges, under a colonial-era law enacted in 1938, carry lighter sentences and have been brought against some media workers, likely to allow punishment for actions that took place before the entry into force of the NSL. A media professional was convicted and sentenced in April to 40 months in prison for sedition and other charges unrelated to his media work.

These cases led the Committee to Protect Journalists to include Hong Kong journalists in its annual global census of imprisoned reporters for the first time. They have also contributed to the growing number of prisoners of conscience in the territory: at least 183 people have been arrested for crimes related to national security since June 2020, and there are more than 1,000 political prisoners in total, including those convicted of protest-related crimes. Activities. Faced with such repression, many Hong Kongers fled into exile. Some journalists and activists have established diaspora media outlets like Flow HK, Commons and The Chaser to cover Hong Kong news and serve the burgeoning exile community.

3. Growth of continental-style state media

As independent media are the target of police crackdowns, the government has moved to convert the once-respected public broadcaster Radio Television Hong Kong (RTHK) into the mouthpiece of the government. RTHK no longer has editorial independence and its staff can be held financially responsible for producing programs that are then censored. RTHK removed much of its pre-NSL content from the internet, depriving millions of residents of access to historical records. In August 2021, the station partnered with Beijing’s China Media Group to air programming that would “convey a stronger sense of patriotism.”

Two newspapers directly owned by the Chinese state – Ta Kung Pao and Wen Wei Po – are increasingly playing a role similar to state media on the mainland, issuing denunciations that could signal future police crackdowns. In September 2020, a senior Hong Kong official hailed Ta Kung Pao as a “golden microphone for the central government”. On June 13, the People’s Daily, mouthpiece of the CCP, published a front-page letter from Chinese President Xi Jinping congratulating Ta Kung Pao on his 120th birthday and for his “contribution to maintaining Hong Kong’s stability.” Kong”.

4. Internet censorship and surveillance

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Hong Kongers enjoyed a relatively free and open internet before the introduction of the NSL, but internet censorship has become increasingly common. To date, eight websites have been blocked in Hong Kong. While this is still a far cry from conditions on the mainland, where the Great Firewall blocks thousands of websites, it represents a significant change.

In May, pro-government lawmakers called on the Hong Kong government to consider blocking access to the Telegram messaging platform under revised October 2021 legislation relating to doxing – the unauthorized disclosure of personal information. on line. While Telegram is still accessible in Hong Kong, the company recently shut down three channels for alleged doxing in response to requests from the Office of the Privacy Commissioner. The law allows the commissioner to arrest users, order the takedown of online content, block websites, and arrest local employees of foreign technology companies if their companies fail to comply with takedown requests. carrying a potential sentence of two years in prison. So far, authorities have used the law to arrest at least six people and delete thousands of posts on 14 platforms.

Even watching a documentary about pro-democracy protests on streaming platforms can be an NSL offense, and authorities are expanding their ability to monitor online activity. On March 1, a law requiring residents to register their SIM cards under their real name came into effect, replicating a system used on the mainland to monitor and arrest internet users. Within a month, 1.4 million cards were linked to real names.

5. Attempt to erase the collective memory of Tiananmen

In another shift to mainland conditions, authorities have sought to erase Hong Kongers’ collective memory of the 1989 massacre of protesters in and around Tiananmen Square, the anniversary of which is marked on June 4. The long-running annual vigil in Victoria Park has been banned since the NSL came into force and the area is now heavily policed, with six people arrested on this year’s sensitive date. Police also arrested four people for spray-painting the numbers “six” (for June) and “four” in the city. In January, an activist was sentenced to 15 months in prison for writing a Facebook post calling on residents to light a candle for the anniversary of June 4, 2021. Beijing has sent letters to consulates of foreign democracies in Hong Kong to complain about their online access. memorials on the occasion of the anniversary. Authorities also removed memorial statues at universities and blocked RTHK from reporting on the subject. Despite the closed space, some Hong Kongers marked the recent anniversary with small gestures of protest.

More soon

On July 1, former police officer and security official John Lee will become Hong Kong’s fifth chief executive. Lee’s selection, through a process imposed by Beijing, signals that the national security crackdown is not over. With the government already banning the media from covering his inauguration and the 25-year-old handover ceremony, it is clear that Lee will continue to restrict press freedom. In fact, the government has announced several bills that would lead to further restrictions on media freedom and freedom of expression.

For example, since May 2021, the government has been working on “fake news” legislation that could lead to more criminal prosecutions of journalists, the closure of outlets and self-censorship. In January 2022, the Secretary of Security announced the government’s intention to enact Article 23 of the Basic Law, a long dormant provision that calls for legislation prohibiting treason, secession, sedition, subversion, the theft of state secrets and the activities of foreign political organizations. Charges of “state secrets” are regularly used against journalists on the continent, while academic, artistic and religious expression has already been targeted by the NSL and could face even tougher restrictions under Article 23. On May 25, the government also announced that it was working on a cybersecurity law to address national security threats online.

The Legislative Council has been devoid of pro-democracy opposition members since a massive resignation in 2020 and the imposition of a repressive new electoral system in 2021, meaning any government-backed legislation is likely to pass with little control.

Next month, the United Nations Human Rights Committee will review Hong Kong’s compliance with its legal obligations under the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. Freedom House submitted a report to the committee on serious violations of press freedom and internet freedom in recent years. It is vital that the committee’s experts publicly and clearly describe how the Chinese and Hong Kong governments have utterly failed to comply with the treaty. In addition to supporting these international accountability mechanisms, democratic governments should provide assistance to those fleeing the territory. The reality is that democracy advocates in Hong Kong have few options outside of jail or exile, and the trend since 2020 suggests that human rights conditions will continue to deteriorate. .

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This video shows a man attacked in southern China, not women attacked in the northeast of the country. https://sentryparentalcontrols.com/this-video-shows-a-man-attacked-in-southern-china-not-women-attacked-in-the-northeast-of-the-country/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 04:47:00 +0000 https://sentryparentalcontrols.com/this-video-shows-a-man-attacked-in-southern-china-not-women-attacked-in-the-northeast-of-the-country/ Copyright AFP 2017-2022. All rights reserved. Shortly after footage of a brutal assault on several women at a restaurant in northeast China began circulating online, another video was shared by several Chinese social media users who claimed that she showed the attack from a different angle. However, the video – which has been viewed thousands […]]]>

Copyright AFP 2017-2022. All rights reserved.

Shortly after footage of a brutal assault on several women at a restaurant in northeast China began circulating online, another video was shared by several Chinese social media users who claimed that she showed the attack from a different angle. However, the video – which has been viewed thousands of times – was shared in a false context. It has been circulating since February 2021 in stories about a man who died after being beaten and then run over in southern China.

“Tangshan, CCTV [footage] from another angle,” reads the simplified Chinese caption of a tweet posted here on June 10, 2022.

The 30-second graphic video appears to show a group beating and kicking a person lying on the ground. A black car then passes over it.

It has been viewed over 4,200 times.

A screenshot of the misleading message, taken on June 15, 2022

The video circulated shortly after footage began circulating online of a brutal assault on a group of women who were dining at a barbecue restaurant in Tangshan, a city in northeast Hebei province. from the country.

The attack sparked outrage over predatory sexual behavior and renewed online debate about sexual harassment and gender-based violence in the country, where the conversation about women’s rights has grown in recent years despite pressure of a patriarchal society, internet censorship and unequal legal support.

Authorities said nine people had been arrested on suspicion of violent assault and “causing trouble”.

The video allegedly showing “another angle” of the attack has been viewed more than 114,000 times after being shared elsewhere on Twitter here and on Gettr here.

However, it was shared in a false context.

Zhanjiang Attack

A reverse image search on Baidu led to this longer video posted in a report by Chinese news agency Phoenix Weekly posted on Weibo on February 20, 2021.

The caption of the post reads: “On the evening of February 19, a video of a fight in Zhanjiang, Guangdong, went viral. The video shows several people hitting and kicking the man in white in After the man collapsed, someone drove a black car over him several times.

“According to the Lianjiang City Public Security Bureau, the suspect in the case has been arrested, The victim was confirmed dead after being taken to hospital, and the matter is being further investigated.”

Zhanjiang is a city in southeast Guangdong Province, about 2,150 kilometers (1,335 miles) from Tangshan.

Below is a screenshot comparison of the video in the fake post (left) and the Phoenix Weekly video (right):

A screenshot comparison of the video in the fake post (left) and the Phoenix Weekly video (right)

Text overlaid on the Phoenix Weekly describes what is shown in the video.

It also includes subtitles for an audio clip of an interview with a police officer starting at 18 seconds.

The officer tells the reporter that the video is real and the incident is still under investigation.

Local news outlets Fujian Daily and Qingdao News also reported on the February 20, 2021 incident.

The Lianjiang City Public Security Bureau issued a notice on February 20, 2021 stating that eight men had been arrested in connection with an investigation into the incident.

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India asks female coaches to accompany athletes after allegations of harassment https://sentryparentalcontrols.com/india-asks-female-coaches-to-accompany-athletes-after-allegations-of-harassment/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 14:16:07 +0000 https://sentryparentalcontrols.com/india-asks-female-coaches-to-accompany-athletes-after-allegations-of-harassment/ Cooking up a legal storm: Syrian restaurant run by refugees offers free food to anti-deportation lawyers LONDON: Imad’s Syrian Kitchen, a refugee-owned Syrian restaurant in London, offered a free dinner on Wednesday to “activist lawyers” who worked to stop the flight carrying asylum seekers from taking off to Rwanda. “To every ‘militant lawyer’ who worked […]]]>

Cooking up a legal storm: Syrian restaurant run by refugees offers free food to anti-deportation lawyers

LONDON: Imad’s Syrian Kitchen, a refugee-owned Syrian restaurant in London, offered a free dinner on Wednesday to “activist lawyers” who worked to stop the flight carrying asylum seekers from taking off to Rwanda.

“To every ‘militant lawyer’ who worked tirelessly to stop yesterday’s flight from taking off to Rwanda, you and one more are invited to a free dinner at our restaurant,” the restaurant tweeted. “Thanks.” On Tuesday evening, the first flight which was to take asylum seekers from the UK to Rwanda was canceled minutes before takeoff after court rulings.

Up to seven people were due to be deported from Britain, but the flight was stopped after a late intervention by the European Court of Human Rights led to further challenges in UK courts.

Speaking to Arab News about the initiative, Imad Alarnab, the Syrian owner and founder of Imad’s Syrian Kitchen, said how upset he was by the UK’s decision to deport asylum seekers .

“I am a Syrian refugee in the UK, and what these people are going through I personally, morally and ethically sympathize,” Alarnab said. “They are going through exactly the same thing I went through five years ago when I came to the country. I’m very upset”

Alarnab has expressed frustration with the “shocking” decisions taken by Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s government, pointing out that asylum seekers are fleeing horrific conditions to safety, but instead face an uncertain future.

Restaurateur Imad Alarnab hoped to incorporate his country’s cuisine into his new life in the UK. (Twitter: @ImadsKitchen)

“I believe Boris Johnson and Priti Patel are using refugees and asylum seekers to distract the public from recent government failures,” he said, adding that people like Johnosn and Patel do not represent the British public.

Alarnab arrived in Britain as a refugee in 2015 after fleeing war and persecution in Syria.

A successful restaurateur in Damascus, Alarnab hoped to incorporate his country’s cuisine into his new life in the UK. He began organizing a series of charity events and supper clubs in partnership with organizations such as UNICEF and the British refugee charity Choose Love.

Alarnab opened his restaurant in May 2021 in London’s vibrant Soho and has pledged to donate £1 ($1.2) from every bill to Choose Love.

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GUNTER: Trudeau’s anti-democratic way of forcing his internet censorship law https://sentryparentalcontrols.com/gunter-trudeaus-anti-democratic-way-of-forcing-his-internet-censorship-law/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 23:07:28 +0000 https://sentryparentalcontrols.com/gunter-trudeaus-anti-democratic-way-of-forcing-his-internet-censorship-law/ Breadcrumb Links Columnists Publication date : June 14, 2022 • 32 minutes ago • 3 minute read • Join the conversation Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaks during a bilateral meeting with United States House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (not pictured) at the ninth Summit of the Americas in Los Angeles, California on June 10, 2022. Photo […]]]>

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Early last month, controversial podcaster Joe Rogan called Prime Minister Justin Trudeau a “creepy dictator” in connection with Trudeau’s imposition of the Emergencies Act to crack down on the convoy of truckers last winter. .

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And it’s not just the American podcaster.

Throughout the pandemic, then the convoy and now the handgun ban, I received almost daily emails containing statements or memes depicting the Canadian Prime Minister as a totalitarian despot.

Of course, Trudeau expressed admiration for China’s “grassroots dictatorship” and raved about Cuban dictator Fidel Castro.

Yet, as much as I despise Trudeau (he’s surly, condescending, mealy, preachy, and ineffectual), living under a real dictator – fascist or communist – would be far worse: locking up opposition leaders, sending in squads of morons to intimidate journalists, filling prisons and camps with people who refuse to comply.

Yet when you consider how he suspended the civil rights of all Canadians just to deal with some stubborn truckers, had the banks freeze the assets of truckers’ supporters, and saw the police lock up rally organizers, you can see how the word d would escape the lips of Rogan and others.

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Now there’s the stunt Trudeau’s MPs made Monday in the House of Commons.

The Liberals and the New Lapdog Party (NLP) voted 174 to 146 to force the Commons Heritage Committee to stop debating C-11, the government’s internet censorship bill. The House of Commons ‘closure’ motion also required members of the heritage committee to approve the bill and return it to the House of Commons within 36 hours.

Once back in the House, the Liberal-NDP Non-Aggression Pact should quickly make C-11 the law of the land. And before you know it, any Canadian posts on YouTube, a podcast or social media can be monitored by the CRTC and – even if legal – ordered removed if the government agency tut-tuts.

The Liberals’ bill and the tactics they are using to get it passed seem pretty darn dictatorial to me.

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Before we go any further, a quick aside: Imagine the outcry if Stephen Harper’s government had a tough bill restricting free speech.

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Groups of constitutional scholars would sign open letters calling for an end to free government as we know it. The trainees would interrupt the throne speech for their own small protests. Protesters would hold vigils for our democracy.

The CBC and the Toronto Star were full of interviews and columns proclaiming that never, ever had there been such an affront to Canada’s parliamentary system of government.

But the Trudeau government is muzzling parliamentary debate on a bill designed to muzzle public debate and there is barely a ripple from the lib-leftists.

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At least Elizbeth May, the former leader of the Greens and still MP for Vancouver Island, had the conviction to say, “I can’t think of a time when such a blatant motion was brought forward at the time ( of Harper)”.

It’s disgusting, but it sounds a lot like Liberal efforts to give border guards virtually unlimited access to the contents of your cell phone, tablet and laptop – without a warrant.

The Trudeau government has asked like-minded senators to introduce Bill S-7 in the Upper House, which would have granted CBSA officers the power to search the personal electronic devices of anyone entering Canada ( including citizens) if officers had a “reasonable general concern” that these devices might contain evidence. of wrongdoing, not necessarily criminal.

At least the Senate is beyond the reach of the Trudeau-Singh coalition, so senators on the national security committee voted to change that wording to “reasonable grounds to suspect” a violation of the law.

Do I think the Trudeau Liberals are plotting to enslave Canadians? No.

But they are anti-democratic buffoons who seem utterly ignorant (and indifferent) to such concepts as the rule of law and limited government.

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“Vkusno & tochka”: McDonald’s restaurants reopen in Russia under a new name https://sentryparentalcontrols.com/vkusno-tochka-mcdonalds-restaurants-reopen-in-russia-under-a-new-name/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 08:27:40 +0000 https://sentryparentalcontrols.com/vkusno-tochka-mcdonalds-restaurants-reopen-in-russia-under-a-new-name/ LONDON: Fast food chain KFC was forced to put cabbage in its burgers and wraps in Australia on Tuesday as the country grapples with a shortage of lettuce due to recent floods that destroyed lettuce crops. KFC Australia said on its website: “Due to recent flooding in NSW (New South Wales) and QLD (Queensland), we […]]]>

LONDON: Fast food chain KFC was forced to put cabbage in its burgers and wraps in Australia on Tuesday as the country grapples with a shortage of lettuce due to recent floods that destroyed lettuce crops.

KFC Australia said on its website: “Due to recent flooding in NSW (New South Wales) and QLD (Queensland), we are currently experiencing a shortage of lettuce. We are therefore using a mixture of lettuce and cabbage on all products containing lettuce until further notice. If that’s not your bag, simply click “Customize” on the product of your choice and remove the lettuce from the recipe. »

Social media users in Australia took to Twitter to mock the decision, while others welcomed the exchange, citing cabbage as an underrated vegetable.

“Looks like a sign of the apocalypse,” wrote one Twitter user.

Another humorously commented, “Has anyone else heard the shocking news!?!? Due to a massive shortage of lettuce, KFC will now be using cabbage as a substitute – True story. The end of the world is near.”

Meanwhile, one user raved about the exchange, saying, “I can’t imagine a majority of dishes don’t actually benefit from replacing lettuce with cabbage. Tacos are good with cabbage, salads are good with cabbage, KFC confuses me because the coleslaw contains cabbage. It is a much better and denser vegetable. Maybe it’s a weird victory.

It is not the first time this year that the company has been hit by food shortages. In January, KFC Australia had to change its menu due to a lack of chicken, caused by a staff shortage at Australia’s largest chicken supplier.

Supply chain issues have impacted fast food chains around the world, particularly in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.

McDonald’s in the UK faced a shortage of tomatoes in March, which heavily impacted its sales of Big Tasty burgers.

In August last year, no milkshakes or bottled drinks were available at McDonald’s outlets in England, Scotland and Wales for a brief period.

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Japan reopens to guided and masked tourists https://sentryparentalcontrols.com/japan-reopens-to-guided-and-masked-tourists/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 07:16:47 +0000 https://sentryparentalcontrols.com/japan-reopens-to-guided-and-masked-tourists/ Foreign tourists visiting Japan will be required to wear masks, purchase private medical insurance and be accompanied throughout their stay, in a gradual reopening after two years of COVID-19 restrictions. Only package tour visitors will be allowed during the first phase of reopening, starting June 10, the Japan Tourism Agency said, adding that travel agency […]]]>

Foreign tourists visiting Japan will be required to wear masks, purchase private medical insurance and be accompanied throughout their stay, in a gradual reopening after two years of COVID-19 restrictions.

Only package tour visitors will be allowed during the first phase of reopening, starting June 10, the Japan Tourism Agency said, adding that travel agency guides accompanying visitors should ensure they are wearing their mask.

“Tour guides should frequently remind tour participants of necessary infection prevention measures, including wearing and removing masks, at each stage of the tour,” the agency said in its guidelines.

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“Even outdoors, mask-wearing should continue in situations where people are conversing in close proximity.”

Japan has imposed some of the strictest border controls in the world during the pandemic, barring entry to almost all non-residents.

As most of the rest of the world opens up from COVID lockdowns, Japan is also relaxing its rules. Prime Minister Fumio Kishida has pledged to bring border measures in line with those of other wealthy countries.

The government has recently started to relax mask guidelines for the general public, although coverings are ubiquitous. Wearing masks to prevent the spread of germs and repel pollen was common in Japan before the coronavirus pandemic.

Japan last month held “test tours” for groups of about 50 people, mostly travel agents, but one of the attendees tested positive for COVID.

James Jang, an Australian travel agent who went on one of the trial tours, said the rules are likely to put some people off at the moment.

“Customers will be ok with wearing a mask indoors, but wearing them around the clock is a problem,” Jang told Reuters.

“The cost of having a guide at all times can deter clients until later when they have more flexibility.”

In 2019, Japan welcomed 31.9 million foreign visitors.

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