Video cameras have been a mainstay of the security industry for many years now


Video cameras have been a mainstay of the security industry for many years, since their first use during WWII. Over the decades, video technology has evolved far beyond the basic functionality that many people associate with camera networks. Video cameras have been a mainstay of the security industry for many years, since they were first used by the German military during WWII to record secret V2 rocket tests.

Wide use of video cameras

The United States followed suit in 1949, with a CCTV project called Vericon, and then, in the early 1950s, VCRs were first paired with small television cameras, and these became available. in commerce in 1956, giving birth to the video surveillance industry. . Cameras have become commonplace in shopping malls, airports, stadiums and other public spaces.

By the early 1990s, technology had evolved into digital multiplexing, which allowed multiple cameras to record at the same time. This period also saw the development of motion-only and time-lapse recording, which improved the functionality of a solution.

The rise of IP cameras

The rise of the IP camera has also inspired a high rate of development in the video market.

In 1996, the first IP camera was created. The IP camera was able to transmit information, videos and images over computer networks, a feature that led to the decline of more basic analog CCTV cameras.

The rise of the IP camera has also inspired a high rate of development in the video market, with higher definition cameras including enhanced features such as wide dynamic range (WDR) and pan / tilt / zoom (PTZ).

Video technology and analytics

Video technology has evolved far beyond the basic functionality that many people associate with camera networks. Video analysis is used to gain in-depth insight into behavior patterns, situational awareness of commercial buildings and other public spaces, and advanced health and safety solutions. It is used in all industries, ranging from education, hospitality, healthcare and even smart cities.

This resulted in a subsequent increase in investment across the region, with a higher growth forecast over the next few years. According to recent statistics from Markets and Markets, APAC is expected to grow at the highest CAGR in the global video surveillance industry, from the period 2020 to 2025. The region is expected to continue to hold the largest market size and be the largest. faster. growing region in the video surveillance market, due to significant investments in smart city projects.

Smart Workplaces and Cities

This essentially indicates a greater use of advanced video elements in technical deployments and a greater possibility of smart integrations. The potential of video deployments is vast, limited only by the imagination and motivation of vendors, integrators and developers.

For example, video analytics is currently being used to help organizations return safely to a corporate environment after lockdown conditions by providing real-time statistics on the number of people in specific areas, the social distancing and remote temperature observations.

Biometric analysis solution for beach monitoring

A system is under development which, when completed, can monitor swimmers on a beach and trigger an alert, if an individual “goes missing”.

By focusing a camera between the “safe for swimming” flags, a biometric analysis solution can count the number of people in the water and instantly alert authorities, if someone does not return to the surface, after the passage of a wave.

Mitigate Risks in Mining

Video technologies are used and constantly developed to mitigate risks in hazardous situations

Mining and resources play a major role in the Australian economy, and the industry has some of the most advanced equipment, technology and infrastructure in the world. However, some roles in the industry are still inherently dangerous.

Video technologies are used and constantly developed to mitigate risks in hazardous situations. For example, sensors attached to advanced cameras, with analytics run through a video management software platform (VMS) can detect particle levels, in an enclosed space, such as a mine shaft, and alert operators. administrators, if these levels become unsafe.

Live animal broadcast at Perth Zoo

Perth Zoo launched a live broadcast of its giraffe enclosure in 2020, allowing online visitors to watch giraffes, including a newborn in their enclosure, 24 hours a day. This has proven particularly popular. during closings, animal lovers remain engaged with the zoo, although they cannot visit it in person.

Another victory for our four-legged friends saw the Victorian Guide Dogs Association adopt heat sensing technology and a network of cameras, which help keep pregnant women safe in the farrowing room.

Infrared cameras detect body heat and movement

Rather than opening the premises, to check for pregnant canines, at all hours of the night and day, infrared cameras are installed to detect body heat and movement, in the farrowing room, allowing staff members to remain vigilant at a distance.

The vast potential of video deployments like these is only limited by the imagination of individuals and the ability of developers to see where improvements could be made, and with the right partners, these visions can come to life.


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